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#730539 - 10/14/12 07:11 PM Heating Oil Tank
JimM Offline
member

Registered: 01/12/02
Posts: 170
Loc: New Jersey
I have to replace my heating oil tank. Its a 275 gal outdoor steel tank, about 20 year old and is rusting at the bottom. No leaks yet but would rather not have that happen. Any opinions on choices out there? Roth? Danby? My oil company says they have a used steel tank but they want $1500 for it. The Roth was $700 more but comes with a warranty. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
THanks

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#730541 - 10/14/12 08:36 PM Re: Heating Oil Tank [Re: JimM]
Clint_Robbins Online   content
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 09/19/01
Posts: 10512
Loc: Akron, OH
I have removed fuel oil free from many 275 gallon tanks for home owners that converted to gas when it become available in their area. I use the oil to heat my house and power my Bobcat skid steer. The tanks are hard to get rid of in this area and most of the home owners I've worked with have been willing to give them away free to anyone willing to remove them.

I once transferred oil from a leaking tank to a spare tank I had, connected the owner of the leaking tank to an owner of a tank I had emptied, the first owner replaced the leaking tank with the unwanted tank, and I then transferred the oil to the replacement tank.

I often see used tanks advertised on Craig's List for as little as $100 and my guess is that some end up being obtained for free by someone offering to remove the tanks. An empty tank can be carried by two men and will fit through most doors.

Water in an oil tank from condensation and/or contamination settles to the bottom quickly. If the tank isn't leaking now, but you want to be premptive, paint the outside, always keep some oil in the tank, and drain any water from the tank when you change the filter.

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#730585 - 10/15/12 09:58 AM Re: Heating Oil Tank [Re: JimM]
JasonB Offline
Sharp -Shooter
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 04/27/04
Posts: 14275
Loc: Cape Spencer, New Brunswick, C...
The roth tanks are an OK system, they'll certainly out-last a steel tank. They're essentially a heavy-duty milk jug (HDPE) tank inside a folded galvanized secondary containment.

They're not, however, my favourite product. I'm not a fan of their plastic nut fittings.

When my own heating oil tank expires (soon), I'll probably replace it with a similar single wall steel one (being in a basement, it has a long enough life), or a Vilco fibreglass tank. Vilco's are available in single or double wall, and I like'em better than the Roths.

That said, I've done system designs with both, and both have performed well in service. I just like a system with NO corrodable parts, and eventually the Roth's steel shell will rust.

Ultimately, all of the above are pretty decent products that would serve you well.

J
_________________________
er, somethin'....

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#730643 - 10/15/12 06:22 PM Re: Heating Oil Tank [Re: Clint_Robbins]
Clint_Robbins Online   content
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 09/19/01
Posts: 10512
Loc: Akron, OH
Quote:
Water in an oil tank from condensation and/or contamination settles to the bottom quickly. If the tank isn't leaking now, but you want to be premptive, paint the outside, always keep some oil in the tank, and drain any water from the tank when you change the filter.

P.S.: My experience with leaking oil tanks is limited, but the two leaking tanks I've seen were both inside garages and the corrosion was from the inside.

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#730670 - 10/16/12 05:16 AM Re: Heating Oil Tank [Re: JimM]
JasonB Offline
Sharp -Shooter
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 04/27/04
Posts: 14275
Loc: Cape Spencer, New Brunswick, C...
My company has an entire group mostly dedicated to home heating oil spill remediation. As a rule, indoor tanks last about 2-3x as long as outdoor tanks, because they experience smaller and fewer temperature swings. This results in less condensation forming inside, thus less water.

Trouble is, when they do fail, the indoor tank often results in a more expensive remediation, as the foundation drainage system can provide a path for the leaked oil. With an outdoor tank, the foundation provides a sort of barrier function.

All this is moot if you're choosing a Roth or other non-corroding tank designs.

J
_________________________
er, somethin'....

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